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"why do you look like you're sad in photos a lot?"
"trauma and crushing mental health problems"
"uhhh"

if you're gonna ask idk what you're expecting, pal

@sophia i'm always surprised that people think i look happy in my photos because that's rarely the feeling i was experiencing while the photo was being taken. apparently they cannot see the true emotion in my eyes while my mouth contorts into a fake smile

@ThatWallflower I'm really good at faking happiness in photos but I'm getting a lot more comfortable about not even trying anymore. Unsurprisingly 'smile more' and questions as to why I'm not smiling have become pretty commonplace.
People are hard to read in photos. Most people don't read the intended emotion well unless it's made extremely clear with additional aesthetics or outside suggestion

@sophia representing different moods in photography makes sense if it's art, which has a broader emotional scope than a quick selfie

@sophia just because you don't take pictures like people on insta or facebook, where everyone is always happy and everything is amazing.
Also random snapshots from a party are not the same as an artistic, carefully prepared selfportrait.

@sophia Love always. You're wonderful. All the best.

@sophia Sometimes I like to answer "how are you doing" completely honestly. A co-worker once earnestly explained to me that they didn't really want to know, they were just making conversation. I told them people at work shouldn't waste my time asking questions they don't want to know the answers to socially, since they already do that enough professionally, and how is it a "conversation" anyway if all they want to hear is "fine, you?"
thank you for listening to my ted talk.

@georgieboy @sophia every single time someone at work asks "hey how are you doing?" i answer "i'm alive" and it causes nervous laughter almost every single time (occasionally earnest laughter)

@sophia shocked_pikachu.jpg

a lot of folks have been conditioned over the years by everyone posting their "best" pictures -- on places and cultures like FB and IG the "best" pictures means the happiest, most successful image of yourself you can portray.... an unrealistic highlight reel of how you'd like people to view your life

so when someone instead posts their "best" pictures in an entirely different sense -- their truest, most vulnerable pictures -- they end up bewildered

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glitterkitten

sparkle sparkle, bitches